Copywriting Hacks: The Ultimate Formula To Breaking The Writer’s Block

Blank page syndrome [or the Writer’s Block] can be frustrating and depressing. Although there’s a controversy surrounding its existence, it’s something most professional writers have experienced at some time in their careers.

And productivity usually plummets at this stage of writing. 

Sometimes, you identify who your prospect is—his pain points and his desires. And you craft a headline that’ll hook the readers to your copy.

But… there comes the writer’s block and you see yourself gazing at the screen wondering “what next now”.

Mike Rose (a cognitive psychologist) published a monograph arguing that this effect was caused by inflexible planning, strategy and assumptions. 

But, regardless of the cause and nature, professional writers need a way to overcome that feeling – blank page syndrome. 

And… Luckily, there are copywriting hacks that can help you overcome this barrier.

There’s a unifying formula for these copywriting hacks. And I’m going to show you – how you can apply it. 

What is this direct response Copywriting formula?

Not until recently, I used to gaze from the left corner to the right corner of my computer screen. 

Wondering …and asking myself what next. 

Each time I took up a new project, I would have to read several copywriting tips and ways I can overcome writer’s block. 

And by the time I would get a tiny loose to kick on, minutes, sometimes hours would have gone by.

But, that’s no more… 

Ever since I discovered the AIDA formula.

Yes! The popular AIDA formula. It works like a charm

I no longer run out of ideas or which angle to start my writing from.

The AIDA formula acts as a skeleton for most sales copy. 

This formula has been in use for over decades and popular sales Copywriters use it in structuring their copies around their audience’s interests.

I still face writer’s block, but each time that comes up, I quickly take a snapshot of this formula—right in my head and in less than a minute, I’m off.

Most times at the speed of light. 

Breaking through writer’s block is as easy as anything else.

You can use this formula to anticipate your audiences’ thoughts, questions and objections.

And magnetize your copy including grasping your prospect and getting them to act—not later— but immediately.

So what does AIDA stand for?

A – Attention

The opening, where you snag your prospect’s attention and quickly convey that what you have to say will benefit him. Usually the headline and the opening sentence.

“The headline is like the doorway into the room you’ve created with the rest of your text. If people don’t walk through the door, they’ll never see what’s inside the room.”

by Tom Albrighton

I – Interest

This is where you pique the interest of your reader by either “rubbing salt in his open wounds” (agitating his pain), or by weaving a story that highlights how he’ll fulfil his desires.

D – Desire

Your reader is interested in your offer. Now it’s time to “stomp on his greed glands” and arouse his emotions by describing how your product/service will enhance his life.

A – Action

After your product sweeps the reader off his feet, this is where you invite him to take action. Usually to buy, download, click or subscribe.

If you spend too much time gazing at a blank screen with a blinking cursor, use the AIDA formula. It’ll inject your copy with a smooth flow and structure that holds your readers’ attention and doesn’t let go.

Writing for the psychoanalytical journal American Imago in 1950, Edmund Burgler proposed genetic and neuroscientific explanations for the “blocking” effect. By contrast, in 1984, the cognitive psychologist Mike Rose published a monograph arguing that the effect was caused by inflexible planning, strategy and assumptions. 

However, regardless of the cause and nature of the problem, professional writers still need a way to overcome the “blank page effect”. Luckily, there are copywriting tools that can help you over the barrier.

Oladoyin Falana
Oladoyin Falana
https://semoladigital.com